AISD Policies and Research

Policies

STUDENT WELFARE – FREEDOM FROM DISCRIMINATION, HARASSMENT, AND RETALIATION

FFH(Legal) – Provides statutory definitions of sexual harassment, employee-student sexual harassment and student-student sexual harassment

FFH(Local) – Expands on the legal references in FFH(Legal) and defines dating violence, bullying, cyberbullying and outlines reporting procedures and the investigation process

FFH(Regulation) – Addresses the process for campus prevention of bullying and harassment

FFH(Exhibit) - Provides the Campus-Based Stay Away Agreement form and Student Complaint form

FFI(Local) - Provides new definition of bullying and information distribution requirements

 

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES – STUDENT CONDUCT

FNC(Legal) – Requires the district to adopt and implement a discipline management program that provides prevention and education concerning unwanted physical or verbal aggression, sexual harassment and other forms of bullying

FNC(Local) – Defines prohibited harassment

 

ADMISSIONS – INTRADISTRICT TRANSFERS AND CLASSROOM ASSIGNMENTS

FDB(Legal) – Provides the authority to transfer a target of bullying

 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE

FO (Legal) – Explains the prohibition of bullying, harassment and making hit lists and ensures that employees enforce these prohibitions

 

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

FN(Local) – Defines expectation of principals to implement school-wide, classroom and individual systems to teach and support positive student behaviors and respond to and make every reasonable effort to prevent all forms of bullying, harassment and violence among students

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

FOF(Legal) – States that a student enrolled in the special education program cannot be disciplined for bullying, harassment or making hit lists until an ARD committee meeting has been held

 

Research

Teen Dating Violence

National Criminal Justice Reference Services - Teen Dating Violence

Teen Dating Violence: National Criminal Justice Reference Service

Study: Middle-Schoolers Think Bullies Are the Cool Kids